14 Reasons to Believe the Sabbath Day Has Changed to Sunday

Did the Sabbath change from the seventh day (Saturday) to the Lord's Day (Sunday)? Here's how we know it did.
Sabbath
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Introduction

If the Israelites observed the Sabbath on the seventh day of the week, why do Christians now observe the Sabbath on the first day of the week? Jonathan Edwards provides 15 reasons in his sermon titled, "The Perpetuity and Change of the Sabbath."

Here, we will present Edwards's arguments. His sermon has been rephrased, and headings have been added, to help us follow his arguments more effectively, but this post essentially follows his sermon point-by-point.

  1. The fourth commandment does not prescribe the specific day the Sabbath is to be observed
  2. Those who were part of the "old creation" kept the Sabbath in commemoration of the work of creation, while those who are part of the "new creation" keep the Sabbath in commemoration of the work of redemption
  3. Hebrews 4:10 explicitly parallels Jesus resting from the work of redemption with God resting from the work of creation
  4. Isaiah 65:17-18 says that things instituted in commemoration of the old creation will not be remembered because there is now a new creation, a "new heavens and a new earth"
  5. Deuternomy 5:15 implies that the Jewish Sabbath was not perpetual, since it was instituted as a remembrance of God delivering the Israelites out of Egypt
  6. Jeremiah 16:14-15 suggests that the memorials of the Jews' deliverance from Egypt will be replaced by new memorials of God redeeming His elect from all over the world
  7. It is reasonable to assume that just as the Jewish Sabbath was meant to be a commemoration of the deliverance of the Israelites out of Egypt, the Christian Sabbath is meant to be a commeoration of the deliverance of Christians from sin, since the deliverance of the Israelites was a type of the deliverance of Christians
  8. Psalm 118:22-24 teaches that the day of Jesus' resurrection is to be a day of celebration for God's people
  9. The Sabbath is supposed to be a day of joy and rest, but Jesus was still buried on the Jewish Sabbath. It makes sense that Jesus' resurrection, the day of joy, would be the new celebration of joy and rest.
  10. Jesus chose to appear to His apostles on the first day of the week
  11. In the New Testament, the apostles directed the church to do public worship on the first day of the week
  12. Revelation 1:10 calls the first day of the week the "Lord's Day," implying that there is something special about it
  13. Throughout history, during the first, second, and third centuries, it was the universal custom of the church to worship on the first day of the week
  14. One reason why clearest statement concerning the Sabbath in Revelation 1 occurs so late is because the full understanding and adoption of the change of day was gradual, similar to some other Christian doctrines

^ 1. The fourth commandment does not prescribe the specific day the Sabbath is to be observed

The fourth commandment does not command one particular day to be the Sabbath, but rather that after six days of work, there should be one day of rest

This is what the fourth commandment says:

8 “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. 9 Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, 10 but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. 11 For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy. (Exodus 20:8-11)

The fourth commandment specifically says, "Six days you shall labor... but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God." The command does not include when the week should begin or end. When the week begins and ends is determined in another way.

Exodus 16:23-26 determined when the week began and ended for the Israelites

Exodus 16:23-26 is the first place the Sabbath is mentioned after the first Sabbath on which God rested, and here, the beginning of the six days of work and the day of the Sabbath rest was determined.

23 he said to them, “This is what the Lord has commanded: ‘Tomorrow is a day of solemn rest, a holy Sabbath to the Lord; bake what you will bake and boil what you will boil, and all that is left over lay aside to be kept till the morning.’” 24 So they laid it aside till the morning, as Moses commanded them, and it did not stink, and there were no worms in it. 25 Moses said, “Eat it today, for today is a Sabbath to the Lord; today you will not find it in the field. 26 Six days you shall gather it, but on the seventh day, which is a Sabbath, there will be none.”

The Israelites had probably lost the true weekly schedule from creation because of their slavery in Egypt

The Israelites were slaves in Egypt and treated cruelly. They had largely forgotten the true religion and would not have been allowed to practice a weekly Sabbath. Because of this, they probably lost the original day of the Sabbath that began at creation.

When God brought the Israelites out of Egypt into the wilderness, He determined the day of the Sabbath for them in Exodus 16:23-26. Nehemiah 9:14 and Ezekiel 20:10, 12 tell us that after God delivered the Israelites, He "made known" and "gave" the Sabbath to the Israelites.

and you made known to them your holy Sabbath and commanded them commandments and statutes and a law by Moses your servant. (Nehemiah 9:14)
10 So I led them out of the land of Egypt and brought them into the wilderness... 12 Moreover, I gave them my Sabbaths, as a sign between me and them, that they might know that I am the Lord who sanctifies them.

The fourth commandment did not determine the seventh day, but rather, the seventh day is whatever day God had determined or will determine

Although the fourth commandment during the time when the Ten Commandments were given referred to the Jewish Sabbath that had already been appointed in Exodus 16, that does not mean the fourth commandment determined that day as the Sabbath day.

It is entirely possible that the same words of the fourth commandment could refer to another seventh day, such as what we have in the Christian church today.

Regarding the fourth commandment, the Christian Sabbath is as much the seventh day as the Jewish Sabbath

Just like the Jewish Sabbath, the Christian Sabbath is kept after six days of work. The only difference is that it begins one day after the Jewish Sabbath.

Six days of work followed by one day of rest follows God's creation pattern

What about the part of the fourth commandment that says, "For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy."?

First, the main point of this verse does not change with the changing of the day of the Sabbath. The main point is that it gives us a reason why we should work for six days at a time, and then rest on the seventh—because God is our example. So, the main point of this verse is still true, even though the day of the Sabbath has changed.

The fourth commandment contains words that do not mean the same to us as they meant to the Israelites

The words of the fourth commandment were given to the Isralites and to the church before the coming of Jesus. These words convey that the keeping of the Sabbath was to commemorate the work of creation.

However, this does not exclude the possibility that the words of the fourth commandment may have a different meaning for Christians today than for the Israelites they were originally spoken to.

There were other words on the tablets of stone that do not have the same meaning for Christians today as they did for the Israelites, namely, Exodus 20:2, which says, "I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery." Similarly, Deuteronomy 5:15 says that the Ten Commandments includes, "You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm."

Because the Ten Commandments are eternal and universal moral truths, they are given to all people at all times. However, the meaning of certain words of the Ten Commandments are different for Christians today than they were for the Israelites.

Specifically, while the Jewish Sabbath commemorates the work of the "old creation", the Christian Sabbath commemorates the work of the "new creation," and while the Israelites were delivered from Egypt, Christians are delivered from sin. The "old creation" and Egypt are types of the "new creation" and redemption from sin.

^ 2. Those who were part of the "old creation" kept the Sabbath in commemoration of the work of creation, while those who are part of the "new creation" keep the Sabbath in commemoration of the work of redemption

There is a "new heavens and new earth"

In Genesis 1:1, we read that "God created the heavens and the earth." The Israelites were to commemorate this work of creation.

Jeremiah 4:22-23 speaks of the destruction, or disappearance, of the old creation because of sin:

22 “For my people are foolish;
they know me not;
they are stupid children;
they have no understanding.
They are ‘wise’—in doing evil!
But how to do good they know not.”

23 I looked on the earth, and behold, it was without form and void;
and to the heavens, and they had no light.

Isaiah 65:17-18 says that God will create a new heavens and new earth, that "the former things shall not be remembered," and that this new creation will happen with the redemption that comes through Jesus because it will happen when "I create Jerusalem to be a joy, and her people to be a gladness.

17 “For behold, I create new heavens
and a new earth,
and the former things shall not be remembered
or come into mind.
18 But be glad and rejoice forever
in that which I create;
for behold, I create Jerusalem to be a joy,
and her people to be a gladness.

Similarly, Isaiah 51:16 speak of God creating a new heavens and a new earth in association with claiming for Himself a particular people:

And I have put my words in your mouth
and covered you in the shadow of my hand,
establishing the heavens
and laying the foundations of the earth,
and saying to Zion, ‘You are my people.’”

Likewise, Isaiah 66:22 speaks of a "new heavens" and "new earth":

“For as the new heavens and the new earth
that I make
shall remain before me, says the Lord,
so shall your offspring and your name remain.

In each of these passages, the creation of a new heavens and a new earth occurs with the gospel redemption of God's people.

Scripture speaks of Jesus bringing in a renewed state of things

2 Corinthians 5:17 says that those in Christ are "new creations," that the "old has passed away," and that "the new has come."

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

Ephesians 2:10 says that Christians have been "created" for good works:

For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

Colossians 1:20 says that Jesus "reconcile[d] to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven."

and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

2 Corinthians 4:6 parallels God shining light out of darkness during creation with God shining the light of knowledge into our hearts:

For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

There is a "new creation" to commemorate

The conclusion of all of this is that there is now a "new creation" to commemorate, one that is even more glorious than the original creation.

^ 3. Hebrews 4:9-10 explicitly parallels Jesus resting from the work of redemption with God resting from the work of creation

This is what Hebrews 4:9-10 (NKJV) says:

9 There remains therefore a rest for the people of God. 10 For he who has entered His rest has himself also ceased from his works as God did from His.

This passage tells us that Jesus rested from His works when He rose from the dead on the first day of the week. We know the pronoun "he" in verse 10 refers to Jesus because only Jesus can be said to have "entered His rest" in a manner parallel with God entering His rest on the seventh day.

That Jesus rested from His work of redemption in a manner parallel with God resting from His work of creation is the reason given that explains why "There remains therefore a rest for the people of God." In the same way that there was a Sabbath for the Israelites due to God resting from His work of creation, there remains a Sabbath for Christians due to Jesus resting from His work of redemption.

^ 4. Isaiah 65:17-18 says that things instituted in commemoration of the old creation will not be remembered because there is now a new creation, a "new heavens and a new earth"

Isaiah 65:17-18 says this:

17 “For behold, I create new heavens
and a new earth,
and the former things shall not be remembered
or come into mind.
18 But be glad and rejoice forever
in that which I create;
for behold, I create Jerusalem to be a joy,
and her people to be a gladness.

Here, Isaiah says that after God creates the "new heavens and a new earth," which will come with Jesus redeeming His people, "the former things shall not be remembered." This very likely includes the Jewish Sabbath.

The logic of this passage is that if the old creation was worth commemorating with the Jewish Sabbath, then the new creation, being much more glorious, is also worth commemorating with the Christian Sabbath. Verse 18 says that God's people will remember and celebrate the new creation forever.

^ 5. Deuternomy 5:15 implies that the Jewish Sabbath was not perpetual, since it was instituted as a remembrance of God delivering the Israelites out of Egypt

Deuteronomy 5:15 says this:

You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. Therefore the Lord your God commanded you to keep the Sabbath day.

This verse tells us that the Jewish Sabbath was also meant as a remembrance of God delivering the Israelites out of Egypt. This means that it is reasonable to believe that the Jewish Sabbath was, at least in one sense, temporary, since people outside of the nation of Israel were not delivered out of Egypt.

^ 6. Jeremiah 16:14-15 suggests that the memorials of the Jews' deliverance from Egypt will be replaced by new memorials of God redeeming His elect from all over the world

Jeremiah 16:14-15 says this:

14 “Therefore, behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when it shall no longer be said, ‘As the Lord lives who brought up the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt,’ 15 but ‘As the Lord lives who brought up the people of Israel out of the north country and out of all the countries where he had driven them.’ For I will bring them back to their own land that I gave to their fathers.

Here, we learn two things:

  1. There will be a day when people will no longer focus on God delivering the Israelites out of Egypt.
  2. The new focus will be upon God delivering His people "out of the north country and out of all the countries where he had driven them," which points forward to Jesus redeeming His elect from all over the world.

    <p>Isaiah 43:16-20 speak of God doing a new thing in redeeming a new people:</p>
    
    <blockquote>
      16 Thus says the Lord,<br />
      who makes a way in the sea,<br />
      a path in the mighty waters,<br />
      17 who brings forth chariot and horse,<br />
      army and warrior;<br />
      they lie down, they cannot rise,<br />
      they are extinguished, quenched like a wick:<br />
      18 “Remember not the former things,<br />
      nor consider the things of old.<br />
      19 Behold, I am doing a new thing;<br />
      now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?<br />
      I will make a way in the wilderness<br />
      and rivers in the desert.<br />
      20 The wild beasts will honor me,<br />
      the jackals and the ostriches,<br />
      for I give water in the wilderness,<br />
      rivers in the desert,<br />
      to give drink to my chosen people,
    </blockquote>
    

^ 7. It is reasonable to assume that just as the Jewish Sabbath was meant to be a commemoration of the deliverance of the Israelites out of Egypt, the Christian Sabbath is meant to be a commemoration of the deliverance of Christians from sin, since the deliverance of the Israelites was a type of the deliverance of Christians

One major purpose of the Exodus, of the deliverance of the Israelites out of Egypt, was to be a type of Jesus delivering His people out of the bondage of sin. And, since the deliverance of the Israelites out of Egypt was to be commemorated with the Jewish Sabbath, then the much greater work of the deliverance of Christians out of their bondage to sin should also be commemorated in some way, namely, with the Christian Sabbath.

Furthermore, the words of the Ten Commandments, which includes the deliverance of the Israelites from Egypt, are relevant to all people of all times, and so the words that are specific to the Israelites should be interpreted as a type and shadow that points forward towards what they ultimately represent, namely, Jesus redeeming His people from sin.

The message of Deuteronomy 5:15 could perhaps be rephrased for Christians like this, "You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt to sin, and the Lord your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. Therefore the Lord your God commanded you to keep the Sabbath day."

The deliverance of the Israelites through the Red Sea was a type of the resurrection of Christ

Deuteronomy 5:15 tells us that the Jewish Sabbath was kept in commemoration of God bringing the Israelites out of Egypt. The day of the Israelites deliverance was the day that the Israelites went through the Red Sea.

Hosea 2:15 (NASB) explicitly ties together the Israelites coming up from the land of Egypt with "singing," which occurred the day the Israelites went through the Red Sea:

“Then I will give her her vineyards from there,
And the valley of Achor as a door of hope.
And she will sing there as in the days of her youth,
As in the day when she came up from the land of Egypt.

The day that the Israelites went through the Red Sea was the day that the Israelites experienced rest from their slavery—this was the day that they sang the song of Moses, and this was the day of their Sabbath rest.

The Israelites coming up out of the Red Sea was a type of the resurrection of Christ. Here are some relevant passages:

Matthew 12:40 - For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.

Psalm 69:1-3, 14-15

Save me, O God!
For the waters have come up to my neck.
2 I sink in deep mire,
where there is no foothold;
I have come into deep waters,
and the flood sweeps over me.
3 I am weary with my crying out;
my throat is parched.
My eyes grow dim
with waiting for my God.

14 Deliver me
from sinking in the mire;
let me be delivered from my enemies
and from the deep waters.
15 Let not the flood sweep over me,
or the deep swallow me up,
or the pit close its mouth over me.

Regarding Psalm 69, much in this Psalm is explicitly tied to Jesus.

Psalm 69:4 - More in number than the hairs of my head
are those who hate me without cause;
mighty are those who would destroy me,
those who attack me with lies.

John 15:25 - But the word that is written in their Law must be fulfilled: ‘They hated me without a cause.’

Psalm 69:9 - For zeal for your house has consumed me,
and the reproaches of those who reproach you have fallen on me.

John 2:17 - His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.”

Psalm 69:21 - They gave me poison for food, and for my thirst they gave me sour wine to drink.

Matthew 27:34 - they offered him wine to drink, mixed with gall, but when he tasted it, he would not drink it.

Matthew 27:48 - And one of them at once ran and took a sponge, filled it with sour wine, and put it on a reed and gave it to him to drink.

Mark 15:23 - And they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it.

Psalm 69:22-23 - 22 Let their own table before them become a snare;
and when they are at peace, let it become a trap.
23 Let their eyes be darkened, so that they cannot see,
and make their loins tremble continually.

Romans 11:9-10 - 9 And David says,
“Let their table become a snare and a trap,
a stumbling block and a retribution for them;
10 let their eyes be darkened so that they cannot see,
and bend their backs forever.”

Psalm 69:25 - May their camp be a desolation; let no one dwell in their tents.

Acts 1:20 - 20 “For it is written in the Book of Psalms,
“‘May his camp become desolate,
and let there be no one to dwell in it’;
and
“‘Let another take his office.’

Therefore, just as the Jewish Sabbath was kept on the day that the Israelites were delivered from Egypt by going through the Red Sea, the Christian Sabbath is kept on the day that Jesus rose from the dead by going through the deep waters. The Jewish Sabbath and the Red Sea were meant to point forward to something much greater, namely, the Christian Sabbath and Jesus' resurrection.

^ 8. Psalm 118:22-24 teaches that the day of Jesus' resurrection is to be a day of celebration for God's people

This is what Psalm 118:22-24 says:

22 The stone that the builders rejected
has become the cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing;
it is marvelous in our eyes.
24 This is the day that the Lord has made;
let us rejoice and be glad in it.

The "stone that the builders rejected" here refers to Jesus. Acts 4:10-11 tells us that Jesus became the cornerstone with His resurrection from the dead:

10 let it be known to all of you and to all the people of Israel that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead—by him this man is standing before you well. 11 This Jesus is the stone that was rejected by you, the builders, which has become the cornerstone.

Psalm 118 tells us that this day that Jesus resurrected and became the cornerstone is to be a day of rejoicing for the church.

^ 9. The Sabbath is supposed to be a day of joy and rest, but Jesus was still buried on the Jewish Sabbath. It makes sense that Jesus' resurrection, the day of joy, would be the new celebration of joy and rest.

The Sabbath is meant to be a day of rejoicing and delight, but Jesus was still buried in the tomb on the Jewish Sabbath. It would not have been appropriate for this day to be a day of rejoicing and delight, but rather, the appropriate day for this delight and rejoicing would be the day of Jesus' resurrection.

Matthew 9:15 says, "And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast."

In other words, while Jesus was in the grave, it was a time for mourning, not for rejoicing. But, when Jesus is once again with His people through His resurrection, then that would be a day of rejoicing.

^ 10. Jesus chose to appear to His apostles on the first day of the week

Jesus appeared to the apostles very intentionally on the first day of the week. The events of Pentacost occurred on the first day of the week:

Leviticus 23:15-16 - 15 “You shall count seven full weeks from the day after the Sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering. 16 You shall count fifty days to the day after the seventh Sabbath. Then you shall present a grain offering of new grain to the Lord.

Jesus appeared to John in Revelation 1:10 on the first day of the week:

I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet

From these verses, it is clear that there was something special about the first day of the week.

^ 11. In the New Testament, the apostles directed the church to do public worship on the first day of the week

The first day of the week was the day that the early church conducted its public worship, and they certainly did this under the instruction of the apostles.

Acts 20:7 says this:

On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and he prolonged his speech until midnight.

It was the on the first day of the week that Paul directed the early church to take up a collection, and not on any other day of the week.

1 Now concerning the collection for the saints: as I directed the churches of Galatia, so you also are to do. 2 On the first day of every week, each of you is to put something aside and store it up, as he may prosper, so that there will be no collecting when I come.

Paul gave these instructions to other churches as well, since the text says, "as I directed the churches of Galatia, so you also are to do." These other churches would also have taken up this collection on the first day of the week. This collection is also mentioned in Acts 11:28-30, 24:17, Romans 15:26, and Galatians 2:10.

Therefore, again, it is clear that the first day of the week was in some way set apart by the early Christians.

^ 12. Revelation 1:10 calls the first day of the week the "Lord's Day," implying that there is something special about it

Not every day is the Lord's Day

Some say that every day of the Lord's Day, and that there is no indication that John's Lord's Day is the first day of the week. However, it is clear that John intended to communicate when he had these visions. And, we know that the Lord's Day refers to the first day of the week because this is what we find in all of the writings of early Christians.

The Lord's Day is a holy and sacred day

The Lord's Day is holy and sacred, just as the Lord's supper is holy and sacred. Both the Lord's Day and the Lord's supper are meant to be a celebration and remembrance of Jesus' work of redemption.

When God puts His name on something, He claims it as His

That the first day of the week is called the Lord's Day means that God claims it for Himself, or, that it is to be dedicated to God. Here are several passages where God puts His name upon something.

Numbers 6:27 - “So shall they put my name upon the people of Israel, and I will bless them.”
2 Chronicles 7:14 - if my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.
Deuteronomy 7:6 - “For you are a people holy to the Lord your God. The Lord your God has chosen you to be a people for his treasured possession, out of all the peoples who are on the face of the earth.
Jeremiah 25:29 - For behold, I begin to work disaster at the city that is called by my name, and shall you go unpunished? You shall not go unpunished, for I am summoning a sword against all the inhabitants of the earth, declares the Lord of hosts.’
Daniel 9:18-19 - 18 O my God, incline your ear and hear. Open your eyes and see our desolations, and the city that is called by your name. For we do not present our pleas before you because of our righteousness, but because of your great mercy. 19 O Lord, hear; O Lord, forgive. O Lord, pay attention and act. Delay not, for your own sake, O my God, because your city and your people are called by your name.”
Nehemiah 11:1 - Now the leaders of the people lived in Jerusalem. And the rest of the people cast lots to bring one out of ten to live in Jerusalem the holy city, while nine out of ten remained in the other towns.
1 Kings 8:43 - hear in heaven your dwelling place and do according to all for which the foreigner calls to you, in order that all the peoples of the earth may know your name and fear you, as do your people Israel, and that they may know that this house that I have built is called by your name.

^ 13. Throughout history, during the first, second, and third centuries, it was the universal custom of the church to worship on the first day of the week

We find that throughout all of history, the Christian church has conducted public worship on the first day of the week. This argument is not sufficient without a foundation in Scripture, but it affirms that public worship on the first day of the week was passed on by the apostles.

^ 14. One reason why clearest statement concerning the Sabbath in Revelation 1:10 occurs so late is because the full understanding and adoption of the change of day was gradual, similar to some other Christian doctrines

John's labeling of the first day of the week as the "Lord's Day" is a clear indication that this day is to be a day that is set apart for God, or in other words, a Sabbath day. Why does this clarity concerning the Christian Sabbath come so late in the New Testament?

God sometimes reveals difficult truths slowly

The Sabbath was a very important institution for the Jews, and so it makes sense that the adoption of the new Christian Sabbath would be gradual, out of respect for the Jewish tradition.

There have been other doctrines that have been gradually revealed for this reason. In Matthew 9:17, Jesus says the following:

Neither is new wine put into old wineskins. If it is, the skins burst and the wine is spilled and the skins are destroyed. But new wine is put into fresh wineskins, and so both are preserved.”

In other words, some of Jesus' teachings were so contrary to Jewish customs that it would have been like putting new wine into old bottles. Because of this, Jesus was sometimes gradual in introducing difficult teachings. He chose specific times to speak about His suffering and death.

Likewise, in Romans 14:22, Paul tells Christians to be considerate of weaker brethren:

The faith that you have, keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the one who has no reason to pass judgment on himself for what he approves.

Also, perhaps the apostles themselves did not immediately know about the Sabbath day changing. In Acts 10, Peter was surprised that he was allowed to eat unclean meat, and He was confused about visiting the Gentiles.

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